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DVORAK SYMPHONY NO. 9

Between the New World and the Old – A timeless musical feast

"What I compose is and always remains Czech music," asserted Antonín Dvorák, and we – the audiences who've been enraptured with the Ninth since its world premiere at New York's Carnegie Hall on 15 December 1893 – are all the richer for it. After a fleeting nod to Negro Spirituals and vaguely Native American rhythms, Dvorák dug into his seemingly bottomless reserve of catchy melodies, foot-tapping rhythms, burnished brass intonations, mellow woodwind lines and other Bohemian traits that would be unthinkable without the pillars of Austro-Germanic music.

 

Of course, the work would most probably never have been written if it hadn't been for a patron, or patroness, to be more precise, Jeanette Thurber, who founded the National Conservatory of Music of America and invited the composer to New York in the hope that he would give birth to a national American music; he had, after all, created a national Czech music...

 

The Ninth's "sharply profiled landscape" sketched by the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra under the incomparable Mariss Jansons was, in the words of the daily newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung, a "musical feast." And London's The Guardian went so far as to proclaim the orchestra "one of the world's great ensembles."

Composer
Antonin Dvorak
Orchestra
Symphonieorchester des BR
Conductor
Mariss Jansons
TV Director
Michael Beyer
Year
2014
Duration
00:46:00
Picture Format
HD
Sound
5.1 Surround Sound
Format
Concert
Amazon
JPC